16 Nov

Key Concept 8: #K12Media

This week marks the end of our special “Key Concept” series of #K12Media chats; this week’s discussion will centre on Concept 8 from the 8 Key Concepts of Media Literacy: All Media Have Unique Aesthetic Forms. Last week we discussed the connection between form and content, examining tensions between photography and storytelling, truth and fiction, audience, producers, and subject.

For a refresher on the concepts: 
http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/teachers/media_literacy/key_concept.cfm

8. Each Medium has a Unique Aesthetic Form

Individuals are drawn to a number of differing media for their enjoyment. Each medium should be understood, studied, and celebrated. Through understanding the aesthetics within each medium, a broader appreciation can be formed that can extend beyond personal opinion.

08 Nov

Key Concept 7: #K12Media

As we continue in our ongoing special series of #K12Media chats; this week’s discussion will centre on Key Concept #7: Form and content are closely related in media. Last week we discussed Key Concept 6: Media have social and political implications. We looked at Twitter and began to think about how social media changes our interactions socially and politically. There will certainly be overlap as this week we will think more deeply about the relationship between form and content.

For a refresher on the concepts:

http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/teachers/media_literacy/key_concept.cfm

7: Form and content are closely related in media.

Each medium contains its own codes and conventions, and will create a representation of reality that reflects the language specific to the medium. What are some of the tensions we can explore between form and content? How do they interact? How does form limit or extend content or vice versa?

31 Oct

Media Literacy Week!

Media Literacy Week - November 1-5, 2010 It's almost November and this year's Media Literacy Week is fast approaching. There are events planned across Canada (you can see a list here), but the one I'm most excited about is going to take place on November 10 at the NFB, Toronto with the Association for Media Literacy  (details below). I hope that you will join us for a wonderful evening of fantastic films and interactive, hands-on learning!

Media Literacy Education and NFB Innovations

Toronto’s Mediatheque has provided teachers with great teaching opportunities for years, and now the NFB is raising the bar!

As part of Media Literacy Week, join the Association for Media Literacy and the National Film Board’s outreach staff for a Wine and appetizer reception. 

26 Oct

Key Concept 6: #K12Media

As we continue in our special series of #K12Media chats; this week’s discussion will centre on Concept 6 from the 8 Key Concepts of Media Literacy: Media have social and political implications. Last week we discussed Key Concept 5: Media have ideological and value messages. We looked at kids’ TV and began to think about some of the messages and ideologies targeted at this age group through popular children’s television programs.

For a refresher on the concepts:

http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/teachers/media_literacy/key_concept.cfm

6: Media Have Social and Political Implications

Media have many spheres of influence—political and social change can stem from shifts that occur within and because of media. The sensory input from visual and aural media, for example, can influence people’s impressions of leaders, world events, and catastrophes. New media  has just as much of an impact, connecting people in ways not possible before their advent; shifting how people socialize and form connections.

20 Oct

Key Concept 5: #K12Media

As we continue in our ongoing special series of #K12Media chats; this week’s discussion will centre on Concept 5 from the 8 Key Concepts of Media Literacy: Media Contain Ideological and Value Messages. Last week was our midpoint mash-up, we discussed how audience negotiates meaning in news media (a combination of key concept #3 and discussion hot topic from week one’s discussion).  This week, the focus shifts back to the text itself and flips the question: How does the text reflect or influence the values/priorities of the audience?